Waiting to Ship according to Steve Jobs

Nov 7, 2013 by

Waiting to Ship according to Steve Jobs

I am listening to Steve Job’s biography written by Walter Isaacson.  Here is one thing that has really resonated with me as I have listened along.

Steve Jobs never shipped anything that he personally wasn’t 100% happy with or he wouldn’t personally purchase himself.

So the thought occurred to me, why do I ship, publish, execute, on my products / services I am not 100% happy with?

The book shares several stories where Steve delayed shipping his products in order to ensure it was done perfect the first time.  The most memorable story is regarding the original iPhone.  If you remember the original iPhone had glass covering almost the entire surface of the phone, which by the way was revolutionary in that day. However, according to Job’s biographer this wasn’t the case prior to shipping the product.  In the middle of the night Steve’s top designer called him and told him it wasn’t perfect, it wasn’t quite right.  The glass wasn’t right.  So you know what they did?  They went back to the drawing board and figured out the right way to do it before they shipped.  They didn’t want to ship a subpar product; they wanted to ship the best product right the first time.  Even though it caused a great deal of work and delay, they got it right the first time

How do you apply this in your own context?  Let’s learn from Steve Jobs, let’s make sure we do our job right the first time before we ship that product, before we run that event, before we write that next blog post.  If we wouldn’t personally want to buy it, read it, or attend it, why would anyone else want to?

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Winning That Talent War

Nov 6, 2013 by

Winning That Talent War

Technology pros want to work on projects that matter and make a difference.  They also want to work on projects / work for companies that are bigger than they are.  Sound too idealistic?  Maybe it does but no one leaves their current, well paying job, for another well paying job simply because you offer benefits and a 401K plan.  Those are standard and expected.

Michael Morell writing at WSJ seems to agree with me,

“If you expect to entice candidates who are in high-demand, you need to define and demonstrate your company culture. New hires tend to not only succeed, but also thrive in a culture that they believe in.”

The key is attracting talent to your company that believes in you and your mission.  So the moral of the story is to tell candidates about the great, big, audacious projects they will be working on at your company.  Then they may consider you.

Oh wait, what if you aren’t working on anything big and audacious?  Well… Maybe it is time to grow your box and work on projects that matter so you can attract that top talent and make a difference.

Happy hiring!

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